Rebreather Courses

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Kiwidiver Instructor on Hollis Explorer Rebreather diving Thailand

PADI Rebreather Courses Thailand

With the introduction of the PADI rebreather course range anyone can learn to dive a rebreather and experience the silence of bubble-free diving while getting closer to marine life than ever before. If you want that “National Geographic moment” then diving a rebreather is the easiest way to achieve it.

Kiwidiver has been a pioneer in rebreather diving, having the largest selection of rebreather units and teaching all levels of PADI rebreather courses. By organizing Try Dive Events and training courses throughout the Asia Pacific region, Kiwidiver has introduced hundreds of divers to their first breath using a rebreather. We have been known to set the benchmark for rebreather training and provide top professional solutions for rebreather divers, rebreather instructors and rebreather dive centers.

Poseidon rebreather course Thailand
Hollis Explorere rebreather course Thailand
AP inspiration rebreather course Thailand

We cover all levels of rebreather courses

PADI-Recreational-Rebreather-Courses-Phuket

Recreational Rebreathers

PADI-Tec-CCR-Courses-Phuket

PADI Tec CCR

Training in pool during PADI rebreather instructor course Phuket

Rebreather Instructor

Divers in open water training on Hollis explorer closed circuit rebreateher Thailand

What do expect from your rebreather training with Kiwidiver

Here at Kiwidiver training is conducted by experienced instructors and Instructor Trainers who are full time PADI professionals. Our rebreather training facility currently has 8 rebreathers of various makes and models and a full range of parts and service items. With our experience with so many different units we are in the best position to advice you on the differences with different types of units and help you choose the right unit and right course.

Although many of our Instructors are qualified to teach other agency courses we choose to teach PADI courses.

PADI Rebreather courses and Rebreather Instructor courses are being conducted under the supervision of Kiwidiver’s Course Director and Rebreather Instructor Trainer Kevin Black. If you are looking for rebreather training for yourself, your staff or your dive center then Kiwidiver have the experience to provide the best solution for you.

A short history of rebreathers

Contrary to many people’s belief PADI rebreather courses have been around for quite some time. In the late 90’s PADI had Distinctive Specialty courses for Draeger Dolphin, the Draeger Ray and the Mares Azimuth semi-closed rebreathers. Although these courses never really made it mainstream due to lack of popularity and the cost / benefits ratio of the semi-closed rebreathers of the time.

All that changed in 2008 when Poseidon launched Poseidon MKVI recreational rebreather. Originally called the Cis-Lunar MKVI and engineered by Bill Stone who and designed the previous five Cis-Luna models. This new fully closed CCR rebreather had so many automated functions that it made it so easy to learn to use that now anyone could dive a rebreather.

In 2011 PADI Launched the PADI Recreational Rebreather Courses followed quickly by the technical Tec CCR rebreather courses. By this time a number of rebreather manufacturers had modified or improved their rebreathers to meet the PADI Recreational rebreather requirements.

PADI Rebreather Courses for closed circuit rebreather and semi closed rebreather in Phuket

Recreational Rebreather Diver Courses

Recreational diver in pool during PADI Discover Rebreather course Phuket

Discover Rebreathers

Recreational divers in pool during PADI Rebreather DIver course Phuket

PADI Rebreather Diver

Two divers prcricing water skills during PADI Avanced rebreather course Thailand

PADI Advanced Rebreather

Tec CCR (Closed Circuit Rebreather) Courses

Technical divers in pool using closed circuit rebreathers during PADI Tec 40 CCR course Phuket

Tec 40 CCR

Two divers in water during PADI Tec 60 CCR course Phuket

Tec 60 CCR

Wreck diving during PADI Tec 100 CCR course Phuket

Tec 100 CCR

Rebreather diving in the tropical waters of Thailand

What are the differences between technical rebreathers and recreational rebreathers?

Some rebreathers are referred to as (type R) recreational rebreathers and some as (type T) technical rebreathers. What is the difference?

Typical features of a Type R recreational rebreather include:

  • The unit should be of robust design and engineered so that it cannot be assembled incorrectly by the user
  • Without a scrubber installed, the unit will not operate will warn* the diver, or fail pre-dive tests.
  • The unit can be used with pre-packed CO2 scrubber cartridges (pre-assembled by manufacturer approved source or technician) or has a simple, user-packable scrubber canister engineered so that it cannot be incorrectly assembled by the user.
  • The diver is prompted to check mouthpiece mushroom valve function and perform a loop positive/negative pressure check during pre-dive checks
  • The unit should automatically attempt to sustain life and warn the user not to dive if the user attempts to dive without following pre-dive procedures correctly.
  • The unit self-calibrates its O2 cells (sensors) and will not pass a pre-dive test unless calibration is successful.
  • The unit will self-initiate or warn* the diver if the electronics are not turned on when the diver starts to use it.
  • The diver should have a simple status indicator in the line of sight indicating if all is well or if a bail out is required (eg: head up display).
  • The diver should be able to switch to open circuit bailout without removing the mouthpiece, using a single action with one hand.
  • The unit automatically adds diluent to the loop as required if the counterlung volume is reduced.
  • The diver is warned* if an attempt is made to dive with any of the gases turned off, or it will turn the relevant gas on automatically.
  • The unit provides with an indicator of remaining battery life and warnings if battery power becomes critically low with ample time to end the dive, and/or has a backup battery system.
  • The diver can read the remaining supply of all gases. The diver is warned if any gas supply becomes low and/or depleted.
  • The unit has a floating setpoint or pre-set set points and switches or adjusts setpoints automatically throughout the dive.
  • The unit will function to a depth of 40 metres/130 feet. 16. The unit will maintain a pO2 close to the setpoint in normal use.
  • The diver is warned* if pO2 is too high. 18. The diver is warned* if pO2 is too low.
  • The unit has a system to warn* the diver if pCO2 is too high or it has a system for indicating when the scrubber should be changed.
  • The loop includes an automatic over pressurization relief valve.
  • The unit should have provision to fit an alternate regulator that can be used by another diver (e.g.octopus rig).
  • The unit has a ‘black box’ data recorder function.
  • The rebreather has undergone nationally or internationally recognized third-party testing against an appropriate standard. Examples would include meeting EN14143 (and having attained CE marking) or meeting the NOAA Minimum Manufacturing & Performance Requirements for Closed Circuit Mixed Gas Rebreathers.
  • The manufacturer must include an operator’s manual that clearly explains how to execute all operations the user will have to perform, how to recognize when any automatic operations have not operated correctly, and the actions to take in such cases. The manufacturer must update the manual if the unit’s design evolves over time.

Required features of a Type T Technical rebreather:

  1. The unit should be of robust design and engineered so that it cannot be assembled incorrectly by the user.
  2. The diver is prompted to check mouthpiece mushroom valve function and perform a loop positive/negative pressure check during pre-dive checks.
  3. The diver should have a simple status indicator in his line of sight indicating if all is well or that a problem exists (eg: head up display)
  4. The diver should be able to switch to open circuit bailout without removing his mouthpiece using a single action with one hand
  5. The diver can monitor the amount of remaining gases carried
  6. The diver is provided with an indicator of remaining battery life and is warned if it is becoming critically low
  7. If oxygen injection is electronically controlled, the unit includes at least one system of redundant electronics
  8. The diver can select the pO2 setpoint manually
  9. The unit will function to at least 100 meters
  10. The unit will maintain a near-constant pO2 in normal use
  11. The diver is warned* if pO2 is too high
  12. The diver is warned* if pO2 is too low
  13. The unit has a system to warn* the diver if pCO2 is too high or it has a system for estimating remaining scrubber duration
  1. The loop includes an over pressurisation relief valve
  2. The unit can continue to operate with some water in the loop and includes a method for removing water from the system. The unit can be used in an emergency mode without an oxygen supply (eg: using manual diluent only/semi-closed)
  1. Where the rebreather interfaces with onboard electronics, the diver is able to indicate whether he is in CC or OC mode
  1. The diver can inject O2 or diluent into the loop manually
  2. The unit has a ‘black box’ data recorder function or is used with a dive computer providing this function.
  1. The rebreather has undergone nationally or internationally recognized third-party testing against an appropriate standard. Examples would include meeting EN14143 (and having attained CE marking) or meeting the NOAA Minimum Manufacturing & Performance Requirements for Closed Circuit Mixed Gas Rebreathers
  2. The manufacturer must include an operator’s manual that clearly explains how to execute all operations the user will have to perform, how to recognise when any automatic operations have not operated correctly, and the actions to take in such cases. The manufacturer must update the manual if the unit’s design evolves over time

Which units may be used in PADI Rebreather Courses?

PADI maintains a register of rebreathers that manufacturers have specified meet the key features of a Type R (recreational) or Type T (technical) rebreather and have successfully undergone internationally recognized third‐party testing against an appropriate standard such as EN14143. Only rebreathers that have been included in this central register can be used for PADI courses.

Recreational Rebreather Courses:

Currently the units that can be used on PADI Rebreather Diver and PADI Advanced Rebreather diver courses include:

Z

Poseidon MK6

Z

Poseidon Se7en

Z

AP Inspiration

Z

Hollis Explorer

Kiwidiver have rental units and teach courses on all of these units.

Tec CCR Courses:

Currently the units that can be used on PADI Tec CCR courses include:
Z

Poseidon MK6

Z

Poseidon Se7en

Z

AP Inspiration

Kiwidiver teach on all these units
(Approved for use in the European Union)

Note: The following units may be used only outside the European Union:

  • Dive Rite O2ptima
  • Hollis Prisim 2
  • Kiss Rebreathers

Do you have questions about the PADI Rebreather Courses?